This week at St. Michael's

Please come along to St. Michaels and collect a bulletin from the porch of the church
which will detail all masses and intentions for the coming week.


The 6th Sunday of the year
17th February 2019

READINGS:

First Jeremiah 17:5-8
A curse on the man who puts his trust in man, a blessing on the man who puts his trust in the Lord.

Psalm 1
Happy the man who has placed his trust in the Lord.

Second I Corinthians 15:12.16-20
If Christ has not been raised, your believing is useless.

Gospel Luke 6:17.20-26
How happy are you who are poor. Alas for you who are rich.

Last Sunday we heard Jesus call Peter to be his disciple. Jesus then travels with Peter and the other disciples. Luke reports acts of healing (a person with leprosy and a paralytic man) and the call of Levi, the tax collector. Jesus also replies to questions from the Pharisees regarding fasting and the observance of the Sabbath. In the verses immediately before today's gospel reading, Jesus is reported to have chosen 12 men from among his disciples to be apostles. Apostle is a Greek word that means “one who is sent.”
Today's gospel reading is the beginning of what is often called the Sermon on the Plain. We find a parallel to this passage in Matthew 5:1-7,11 that is often called the Sermon on the Mount. As these titles suggest, there are differences and similarities between these gospel readings.
When spoken from the mountaintop in Matthew's Gospel, we can't miss the impression that Jesus is speaking with the authority and voice of God. The mountaintop is a symbol of closeness to God. Those who ascend the mountain see God and speak for God; recall the story of Moses and the Ten Commandments. As Luke introduces the location of Jesus' teaching, Jesus teaches on level ground, alongside the disciples and the crowd. Luke presents Jesus' authority in a different light. He is God among us.
Another distinction found in Luke's version is the audience. Luke's Sermon on the Plain is addressed to Jesus' disciples, although in the presence of the crowd; Matthew's Sermon on the Mount is addressed to the crowd. In keeping with this style, the Beatitudes in Luke's Gospel sound more personal than those in Matthew's Gospel—Luke uses the article “you” whereas Matthew uses “they” or “those.” There is also a difference in number: Matthew describes eight beatitudes; Luke presents just four, each of which has a parallel warning.
The form of the Beatitudes found in Luke's and Matthew's Gospel is not unique to Jesus. Beatitudes are found in the Old Testament, such as in the Psalms and in Wisdom literature. They are a way to teach about who will find favor with God. The word blessed in this context might be translated as “happy,” “fortunate,” or “favored.”
As we listen to this Gospel, the Beatitudes jar our sensibilities. Those who are poor, hungry, weeping, or persecuted are called blessed. This is, indeed, a Gospel of reversals. Those often thought to have been forgotten by God are called blessed. In the list of “woes,” those whom we might ordinarily describe as blessed by God are warned about their peril. Riches, possessions, laughter, reputation . . . these are not things that we can depend upon as sources of eternal happiness. They not only fail to deliver on their promise; our misplaced trust in them will lead to our demise. The ultimate peril is in misidentifying the source of our eternal happiness.
The Beatitudes are often described as a framework for Christian living. Our vocation as Christians is not to be first in this world, but rather to be first in the eyes of God. We are challenged to examine our present situation in the context of our ultimate horizon, the Kingdom of God.

above text ref: https://www.loyolapress.com

Mass Intentions and Ministries

This information is pdated from the bulletin.
PLEASE check with the church directly for up to date times of masses.

Saturday 16th February

Refreshments served after
Vigil Mass
by L Poole & friends

6.00pm
John Wilson

R & BP: Group B
SM: Group 2 B1
Servers: T Higgins &
O Smith, M Thompson

Sunday 17th February

Refreshments served after
Mass by P Winship &
M Gallagher

10.00am Parishioners

12noon
Baptism of Eleanor Wilson

R & BP: Group B
SM: Group 2 B1
Servers: J & E Marston
O Laws & L Burrell
K Forrest & K Smail

Monday 18th February

9.30am
Simon Brennan
Reader
N Finnigan
Special Ministers
H Brennan &
Mgt Brennan

Tuesday 19th February

12 noon
Funeral Service for Betty Vine
7.00pm
In thanksgiving (EL)

Reader
M Donaldson
Special Ministers
M Lockey & A Burns

Wednesday 20th February

9.30am
The Potts family

Reader
M Steel
Special Ministers
N Finnigan & T Finnigan
Thursday 21st February
St Peter Damian
9.30am
Private Intention
Reader
J Wotton
Special Ministers
F Wotton &
Michael Brennan

Friday 22nd February
The Chair of St Peter

9.30am
Liturgy of the Word
& Holy Communion Service
Reader
D Willis
Special Ministers
M Hearne & A Morgan

Saturday 23rd February

Refreshments served after
Vigil Mass
by L Poole & friends

6.00pm
Beatrice Thompson

R & BP: Group C
SM: Group 3 C1
Servers: T Higgins &
O Smith, M Thompson

Sunday 24th February

Refreshments served after
Mass by R & M Nelson

10.00am Parishioners

R & BP: Group C
SM: Group 3 C1
Servers: P Turnbull

EXPOSITION OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT:

One hour before weekday Mass (except Vigil Mass)

PRAYERS:

Please pray for those who are sick or housebound in our Parishes:
Fr David Tanner, Fr Joe Burton, Fr Pat McKenna, Brian Copeman, Harry & Nita Lax, Jenny Gray, Craig Miller, Mary Anderson, Mary Brightwell, Molly Baines, Mary Connaughton, Tom Brennan, Tracey Rankin, Winnie Bilton, Alan Rhys-Evans, Pat Fletcher, Kyna Richardson, Irene Bowater, Kaya Isli, Eugene Bell, Thomas Russell, Moira Waugh, Joe Porter, Kathleen Hartis, Nathan Pearce, Susan Miller, John Bleanch, Jim and Margaret Smith.

Please pray for diocesan Priests whose anniversaries occur this week:
Canon Wilfred Blenkin, Fr Reginald Durnin, Fr Robert Thompson, Fr William Smith, Fr Vincent McCLean, Fr Raymond Crumbley, Fr John Caden, Fr Wilfred Duffy and Fr Raymond Conroy.
Animated Praying Hands